Device compatible charge separation

The aim of this project is to develop novel device compatible charge separators operating in the visible range for application in a tandem cell based on proton coupled electron transfer that provide charge separated states sufficiently long to facilitate multi- electron catalytic processes to occur.

Harvesting light for efficient Förster resonance energy transfer and to induce charge separation in the artificial reaction center of the artificial leaf requires rugged supramolecular assembles of chromophores with strong, broad absorptions in the visible to near-infrared region. Based on the photosystems I and II many porphyrin-based antenna systems have been developed, complemented with dyes like arylene (di-)imides, heteroleptic ruthenium(II) terpyridines, and linear and T-shaped boron-dipyrromethene dyads for optimal light absorption and emission to enable fast migration of light excitation energy.

In this project the chromophore building blocks are synthesized and characterized that span the spectral range of 300 - 700 nm, for incorporation in the organic-inorganic device concept. To achieve the required strong absorbance and exceptionally high photostability, our starting point will be the established naphthalene, perylene, and terrylene bisdicarboximides family of dyes. These will be connected covalently with rod-like linkages, tuned for their spectral properties by site-specific substitution, and then linked to ligands for the catalysts available from the projects in knowledge gap 1. This will result in controlled self-assembly of light-harvesting aggregates.

The project will be a success if we can develop novel device compatible charge separators operating in the visible range for application in a tandem cell based on proton coupled electron transfer that provide charge separated states sufficiently long to facilitate multi- electron catalytic processes to occur.


The work in this project is primarily done at the Department of Chemistry & Pharmaceutical Sciences, section of Organic Chemistry, of the VU University, Amsterdam


Doorzoek de website